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for more self-inflicted wounds, certainly not those coming from washington. >> analysts say failure to reach a deal with poison u.s. consumer spending. the fiscal cliff would trigger tax increases and government spending cuts in january, leaving far less money in the economy. the international monetary fund warrants of knock on effects for the global economy. -- warns of knock on effects for the global economy. the pressure is on in washington to agree on a plan. only then might the applause on wall street be a little more genuine. >> with the clock ticking ever more loudly in washington, let's bring in our correspondent. first off, are the prospects of an agreement as dim as we are hearing, or could there be a last-minute deal? then of course this could happen, but i think it is quite unlikely. there is an increased pessimism that a deal can be achieved in washington, d.c. from my perspective, i think washington moves too slowly. tax rates will go for all americans, and cuts will go into effect by the end of this year, and we will see no more unemployment benefits for about 2 milli
on the poor. there's an article in today's -- in "the washington post" on december 19, job boehner's plan b would raise taxes on the poor. really? i mean, is that how you're going to balance the budget? by sticking it to people who already are in vulnerable times? this is wrong. my friends talk about the debt, the deficit, but what they don't talk about is that we have fought two wars, in iraq and afghanistan, and we haven't paid for it. all on our credit card. we send our young men and women into harm's way and we ask them and their families to sacrifice and we do nothing. we just put the bill on our credit card. a few months ago the chairman of the budget committee, mr. ryan, says about $1.3 trillion, i think he's low-balling it, but $1.3 trillion on our debt and nobody over there says a word. they all go after programs like social security and medicare and food stamps. so, mr. speaker, i ask that we defeat the previous question and if we defeat the previous question i will offer an amendment to this rule to make in order an amendment which will allow the house to have a chance to vote on
in the white house. tonight, on c-span. >> columnist george will spoke recently at washington university in saint louis about the role of religion and politics. it was hosted by the center on religion and politics will hear from former senator john danfor th, just before mr. we will speaks. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special
signs the fiscal cliff talks are on the brink of collapse. chief washington correspondent john harwood joins us from washington with the details. i look away for two seconds, john, and everything's falling astart. >> it looked a couple of days ago as if the two sides were getting closer. when president obama had a news conference at the white house today, he came out to talk about gun control measures in the wake of the connecticut tragedy, but the questions were mostly focused on the fiscal cliff. the president said he couldn't understand why john boehner was detouring to plan b because the differences are narrow enough that they can still work it out. >> i've said i'm willing to make some cuts. what separates suss probably a few hundred billion dollars. the idea that we would put our economy at risk because you can't bridge that gap doesn't make a lot of sense. >> the smackdown from john boehner came shortly afterwards. it was short and sweet. he spoke for less than a minute and he said the onus is going to be on president obama if we go over the fiscal cliff. >> tomorrow the house w
'm a small business owner from washington state, and this campaign does not have our best interests at heart. we need to fix the economy before the debt, you know, because i need customers. i don't need corporate -- [inaudible] trying to steal my medicare money. >> all right. i look forward to visiting afterwards for all of our ohio constituents who are here. where was i? so, thank you. but i do appreciate the opportunity to talk for a moment about tax reform -- >> senator portman, i'd like to make it clear that senior citizens are not -- [inaudible] we cannot -- [inaudible] >> um, as you can see, there's a lot of strong opinions on how we deal with our record deficits and debts, but i think everybody here and certainly the folks i talk to back home agree we have to. and these decisions won't be easy. as maya said, the political process is such that it's controversial, and we're going to hear plenty of opinions, it sounds like, from our panelists just as we have from the audience. >> i want to know what you're going to do to make sure the middle class -- >> let him speak! >> boo! >> middle c
? is there a singular documentary film, television show, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> my reaction was "saturday night live." i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. thank you very much. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work f
, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. but maybe in america that was also at its best. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> david? >> my reaction was "saturday night live." [laughter] i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i find it fascinating. between saturday night live in jon stewart, -- and jon stewart,i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. peyton place. >> really? >> thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up on c-span -- talks about the judicial system with supreme court justices stephen briar and anthony kennedy. and
. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors and please chiefs. we have never, to my knowledge, had anybody who has ever created, let alone starred in movies or tv series until tonight. and we have michael lynn on the to thank for that. mike sl co-
, it is not only vote on the ground, this is an understanding in washington why many people are here. you talk about helping syria. it is basically getting enough help, either of the aid -- enough aid to help those that have been fighting for over a year. there are many commanders that have been proven to be a very trusted people. i really do not know how much this administration tried to find the good people, because when you talk to the officials there, how do you know who was good and bad? if you start trying to find your man now, you are probably too late already. this is my last point, i personally know a couple of people who have been living in the u.s. for 20-30 years and have been financing and fighting themselves. at least they could be easy to fund, but unfortunately they always complain they could not get allegiance from the administration. >> your answer is the u.s. government should provide more support to the insurgency? he could definitely. >> in the form of? >> heavy army. >> in terms of recommendations for the administration, they need to understand time is not on their side.
deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year including the conventions so we're very excited to bring the sensitive conversations about the issues driving washington thanks to the bank of america. thank you to your colleagues. you may have
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10